Unread books

I need to be reading more. I still have Conducting the Reference Interview (2nd ed.) by Catherine Ross, Kirsti Nilsen, and Marie Radford; and Defusing Hostile Customers Workbook (3rd ed.) by Robert Bacal, to look at. I’m thinking that my unconscious prioritization of this may be stopping me from reading other things.

This book of Bacal’s, in particular, can be a bit triggering for me — I may have mentioned it someplace or another, online. As regards discouragements, the first book I mentioned has recently come out with a 3rd edition. Which…I just ordered. I hate that I just ordered it, but it happened, and now I have to live with it.

The 2nd ed. was published in 2009, and it is tech-intensive enough so that it makes sense to upgrade to the new one. I don’t want to have to deal with repeated material or outdated material.

I may have an upcoming job interview; also possibly a placement test, if I’m selected. I’m still waiting on those calls. If either of those two things happens…I’ll want to know some of the information in Conducting the Reference Interview. I took the latter to work recently (the 2nd ed.) but didn’t want to take a break out of my time focusing on library work, in order to focus more on librarianship.

Recently, I finally got the book, Introduction to Tibetan Buddhism by John Powers. I loved his Concise Introduction to Tibetan Buddhism, some years ago; it was likely the first book I checked out from a public library that I read all the way through after I got my BA. It’s certainly the one which stood out most, to me.

The main difference between the two books is that the latter is condensed, while the former is full-length. The full-length one is the one I bought…and it’s extremely thick. I mean, extremely, close to 1.5″ if you look online. I haven’t gotten to break into it, yet, and really, it’s a little intimidating (although the length may be a bonus if one is really interested in the material).

The major drawback that I can see is the fact that all the specialized terms are translated into English, which …may be understandable, given that we’re talking about Tibetan Buddhism, and written English transliteration of Tibetan is notoriously difficult to understand (or pronounce) without prior knowledge of the language. There is a glossary in the back of the book, but it still would have been nice to not have to translate everything out of standard English and into a transliteration of Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit (with which I’m more familiar…but I’ve been studying this stuff for about 15 years, and this is an “introduction” to the systems).

Speaking of Buddhism…I want and/or need to read up on Robert Spence Hardy, to see what to watch out for in English-language interpretations of “Buddhism”. Hardy is unreliable and only a partial source, but at the same time highly influential, being one of the first people to relate Buddhism as a system to English-speaking audiences. Hardy himself was a Methodist missionary, so there is an obvious conflict of interest in his representing Buddhism to English-speaking people. His works can be found online. I’m interested in reading him so I can then recognize people parroting him in multiple different English-language renditions of Buddhism.

I wouldn’t have known anything about him at all without reading the first essay (by Judith Snodgrass) in TransBuddhism: Transmission, Translation, and Transformation, edited by Nalini Bhushan, Jay Garfield, and Abraham Zablocki. (See JSTOR.) I should really read more of the essays in that book, though I lost interest back when I stopped having faith in the system, and as a consequence, started to believe studying it was a waste of time.

I am at the point of realizing now, though, that I can have interest in Buddhist ideas and not necessarily have to, “believe in,” anything anyone associated with the religion says (even though we do have a culture which emphasizes, “faith,” as a good thing, in the United States). One of my coworkers advised me that it would be OK to seek out a Buddhist priest to talk about my misgivings with the religion (or rather, the English-language presentation of the religion).

Beyond that, I do still have those two books on creativity and mental illness, that I’m in the middle of: Touched With Fire: Manic-Depressive Illness and the Artistic Temperament, by Kay Redfield Jamison; and The Midnight Disease: The Drive to Write, Writer’s Block, and the Creative Brain, by Alice Flaherty.

I stopped reading those two largely because I realized that it might be better for me to exercise my creativity at that moment, than to read about creativity. The latter seems to be a convenient distraction. I know I can read these books when I really am not feeling creative. While it is possible to believe I can’t make anything and then self-fulfill that, I know that taking it one step at a time does get things done. There are still times that it’s easier to space out or otherwise be relatively passive, though (although I tend to consistently challenge what I’m reading, as I’m reading it — so reading, for me, isn’t really wholly passive).

Beyond that, I also recently picked up the 5th edition of Learning PHP, MySQL, and JavaScript by Robin Nixon, 2018, O’Reilly Media. This book is also super-thick (about 1.5″), on par with my CSS text for my Web Design class, CSS: The Missing Manual, 4th ed., by David McFarland, 2015, O’Reilly Media. That book was extremely useful at the time, however.

It is important for me to learn this stuff, though I haven’t been back to my JavaScript course for several weeks. At the rate things are going…well, actually, maybe I will have time to deal with it coming up, because everything I had to deal with as regards graduation (which was a lot), is over.

Anyhow, I got the above book in print rather than electronic format because, not having seen it, I was concerned that the electronic version may have been inferior. This was an especial concern where the book uses at least four different typefaces to mean different things in context. As my eReader can change its own fonts…I was concerned enough to order the paper version. As it turns out, the print is pretty straightforward, and looks fairly similar to my electronic sample.

The biggest difference between print and electronic seems to be the sheer weight of the thing (the print version is 3 lbs.), plus the lack of clickable hotlinks and electronic searchability. However…I also don’t have so much faith that my eReader will continue to work more than a few years into the future. When it fails, I’ll need the paper backups (or to buy a new eReader to access my library, which I’m not entirely confident will be a good option).

Right now I’m just working on filling skill gaps (I have two more courses to go before I’ll be done with my Cataloging series), applying for jobs, learning to drive, and keeping up with work. And, right; trying to find the time to read, and work on the creative stuff (which is still important, especially if I’m going to work in a Public Library setting). I’m finding myself becoming surprisingly unused to reading paper books, though.